Schoolgirl died of meningitis


Schoolgirl from Wetzlar died of dangerous meningitis.

According to the health authority, a student at the Wetzlar vocational school died of the consequences of highly contagious meningitis. The disease was not diagnosed until Wednesday. The woman was then taken to the local hospital.

A vocational student from Wetzlar, Lower Saxony, died of highly contagious meningitis. The disease was not diagnosed until Wednesday. The woman suffered from high fever, nausea and vomiting. The condition of the young woman was already life-threatening on Wednesday. Just one day after being admitted to the clinic in Wetzlar, the student died of the effects of menigitis.

According to the district administration, there was bacterial meningitis (meningitis), which was caused by meningococcal bacteria. The disease is notifiable and is considered very contagious. As a precaution, pupils, teachers and parents from the environment of the deceased received antibiotics to prevent the disease from spreading.

There are two types of meningitis, viral (caused by viruses) and bacterial, purulent meningitis. The disease is usually transmitted by tick bites. Typical symptoms of meningitis are suddenly high fever, headache, tiredness, dizziness, nausea, stiff neck and chills. If the course of the disease is severe, it can also lead to impaired consciousness and fainting. The disease can also be transmitted from person to person through droplets. For this reason, it is important to provide medical care to all people in the immediate vicinity and to administer antibiotics as a preventative measure. Most purulent, bacterial meningitis affects children up to the age of 15 (52 cases per 100,000 inhabitants in the first 5 years of life). The disease is less common in adults. An infection with viruses, on the other hand, is less dangerous and usually heals again after a few days. (sb, 09/24/2010)

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Video: How Meningitis Spreads. WebMD


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